What Goes Into a Good Exhibit?

When we exhibit garden items at the Fair, we gain knowledge. We learn how to produce a good specimen, how to prepare and transport it, how to share our knowledge with others and learn what our friends have produced, and finally, through judging, how well we have met approved standards.

 

Exhibitors should familiarize themselves with terms such as “type”, “uniformity”, “maturity”, “and freedom from damage”, “substance and cultural perfection”.

 

The Judges criteria for classes are that all specimens should be true to type–characteristics common to that particular species and subspecies of flower, vegetable or fruit. Uniformity refers to a specimen’s size, shape and color. If the premium list calls for a single specimen, it must show it is true to type; many categories call for multiple lots and the lot members should be uniform in every respect. It is taken for granted that all members of a lot should be of the same variety. Also, when a particular variety has a special characteristic, it should be present in all specimens; for example, a fruit, which has a pink cheek, the size, shape, and degree of pinkness of the cheek, should be the same in all specimens exhibited. Symmetry in shape and good color also are factors to consider.

 

All produce should be mature. Items that have not opened full or are not fully ripened should not be shown. However, overripe or over-mature material also is not suitable.

 

The term “freedom from damage” encompasses mechanical injury, that is, damage caused by man or machine while the plant is growing, or the specimen has been picked; it also can be caused in transit to the Fair.

 

Insects or diseases cause another type of damage, and this will greatly affect scoring. Spraying or dusting will control pests, but pesticide residue also will cause points to be deducted. Soil or dirt on a specimen is inexcusable. Substance means that a specimen is not wilting or shriveled, that the cells within the specimen are full of water and that the specimen will hold up well on the Fair exhibit table. A specimen of good substance is at the peak of maturity and has had proper handling.

 

An exhibit that shows signs of nutrient deficiencies, crooked or weak stems, flowers placed at an improper angle on the stem, weather-spattered areas on the leaves or flowers, foliage burn due to high light intensities or sprays, bleached areas on the underside of the fruit, or sunburned areas lacks cultural perfection.

 

Preparing a specimen to take to the Fair is essential. Good conditioning begins the moment the stem of a flower, fruit or vegetable is severed from the parent plant. Be sure and use a sharp knife. For flowers, place the cut stems in water immediately. Cut stems on a slant; this is beneficial because the stems will not squarely touch the bottom of a container and the water-conducting vessels of the plant are less likely to become clogged with dirt.

 

When we exhibit garden items at the Fair, we gain knowledge. We learn how to produce a good specimen, how to prepare and transport it, how to share our knowledge with others and learn what our friends have produced, and finally, through judging, how well we have met approved standards.

 

Exhibitors should familiarize themselves with terms such as “type”, “uniformity”, “maturity”, “and freedom from damage”, “substance and cultural perfection”.

 

The Judges criteria for classes are that all specimens should be true to type–characteristics common to that particular species and subspecies of flower, vegetable or fruit. Uniformity refers to a specimen’s size, shape and color. If the premium list calls for a single specimen, it must show it is true to type; many categories call for multiple lots and the lot members should be uniform in every respect. It is taken for granted that all members of a lot should be of the same variety. Also when a particular variety has a special characteristic, it should be present in all specimens; for example, a fruit, which has a pink cheek, the size, shape, and degree of pinkness of the cheek, should be the same in all specimens exhibited. Symmetry in shape and good color also are factors to consider.

 

All produce should be mature. Items that have not opened full or are not fully ripened should not be shown. However, overripe or over-mature material also is not suitable.

 

The term “freedom from damage” encompasses mechanical injury, that is, damage caused by man or machine while the plant is growing or the specimen has been picked; it also can be caused in transit to the Fair.

 

Insects or diseases cause another type of damage, and this will greatly affect scoring. Spraying or dusting will control pests, but pesticide residue also will cause points to be deducted. Soil or dirt on a specimen is inexcusable. Substance means that a specimen is not wilting or shriveled, that the cells within the specimen are full of water and that the specimen will hold up well on the Fair exhibit table. A specimen of good substance is at the peak of maturity and has had proper handling.

 

An exhibit that shows signs of nutrient deficiencies, crooked or weak stems, flowers placed at an improper angle on the stem, weather-spattered areas on the leaves or flowers, foliage burn due to high light intensities or sprays, bleached areas on the underside of the fruit, or sunburned areas lacks cultural perfection.

 

Preparing a specimen to take to the Fair is essential. Good conditioning begins the moment the stem of a flower, fruit or vegetable is severed from the parent plant. Be sure and use a sharp knife. For flowers, place the cut stems in water immediately. Cut stems on a slant; this is beneficial because the stems will not squarely touch the bottom of a container and the water-conducting vessels of the plant are less likely to become clogged with dirt.

 

Give us a call:

859-635-2667

 

Located at:

100 Fairground Road

Alexandria, Ky 41001

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